Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Book Review: Foundation by Isaac Asimov

I always wanted to read Asimov's works and I had heard a lot about his Foundation Trilogy. This book, first in the trio, is a series of stories/episodes loosely coupled but held together by an idea called the Foundation. It starts with Hari Seldon and his pupil Gaal Dornick - the physcohistorians, who predict future history based on mathematical calculations. Then he is exiled from his home planet, Trantor, to establish a colony called the Foundation on the periphery of the galaxy. As years go by, a series of crisis occur as foretold by Seldon. These crises are entirely political with the sole intention to gain absolute power. The internal affairs and the barbarous planets try to take over the Foundation and ultimately the Galactic Empire.

Hari Seldon seen inside the Time Vault
On the whole its about the relationship between super-advanced science- especially the use of nuclear power- and humanity. The nuclear power is used as a primary weapon not only in warfare but also as a commodity for trade. What I really loved about the book is the crisis themselves. They appealed to my senses very much. I mean, the devious plots in the grand scheme of politics are very intriguing. Also, it was even more fun reading about the resolution of the crisis for protecting the interests of the Foundation. Isaac Asimov has written the episodes so cleverly that all of it is in the form of no-nonsense, obscure, high standard conversations. Thus making it a high voltage, enjoyable political drama. It easily showcases his intellect. I really hope you will enjoy this book. Now, I have decided to pick up the next in the trilogy: Foundation and Empire. Until next time...